The Gilbert Scott

British food seems to have gotten a bit of a revival recently, and that too, thanks to some of the countries finest. Till now, Gary Rhodes and the Ivy mostly topped the charts for good homeland grub – and to the shock and surprise of most people, British food does have more to its repertoire than fish & chips, sausages & mash, and, erm, burgers. Oh yeah, pies! Yes, there is more to it than what one finds in pubs everywhere, and dodgy expat bars across Europe. There is, for example, a roast dinner that’s chewy like rubber, there is overcooked vegetables and lest we forget, the humble saveloy – best battered and doused in vinegar.

Luckily and very thankfully, the last bit’s not true. Well, not entirely. There’s a ton of fantastic regional and historic food that Gary Rhodes and Mark Hix have steadfastly promoted in their restaurants and books. And this year, came another two big hitters, Heston Blumenthal with Dinner and Marcus Wareing with The Gilbert Scott

Named after the architect who built St. Pancras station, the restaurant resides in the very grand and recently refurbished St. Pancras hotel. It’s a beauty of a building and even if you don’t go there to eat, go have a cocktail – some fabulous creations inspired by English gardens, including a delicious one with lavender and bergamot. As it was riot night in London and our initial booking at Fredericks in Islington had to be cancelled due to kind requests from the police to close the restaurant early, we found ourselves sitting in a very quiet Gilbert Scott.

 

 Lincolnshire haslet: pork, liver, sage and onion terrine with greengages.

Fairly decent pork terrine. As good as any, which is to say it was good, but not special. Quite nice with the greengages and seasonal too.

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 Brown and Forrest salmon, caper butter, soda bread. Simple as can be – the menu doesn’t actually say it’s smoked salmon and neither does your waiter tell you. I personally found this to be quite a disappointment and quite expensive for a bit of smoked salmon, butter and bread.

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 Scottish halibut, ceps and roasted cauliflower Now that’s a serious hunk of fish. A well cooked halibut is certainly a thing of joy and beauty. Just wish there had been a bit more of the lovely ceps and cauliflower, but we did have some pease pudding, roast potatoes and colcannon to go with our mains. The only discrepancy was in the description of colcannon which said ‘crushed potatoes’ and the dish itself, which was a very creamy mash (puree). And it did seem as though the roast potatoes were actually triple cooked (ie. finished in the fryer).

 Cumbrian rump of lamb, artichokes, tomatoes, mint relish.

Oh yes. Yes  indeed.dGorgeous bit of lamb with classic accompaniments.

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 Orange marmalade jaffa cake, earl grey tea ice cream Ah…this meal just reached its zenith. What a beautiful little pudding. Thin slices of poached orange covering a moist cake and warm gooey chocolate  inside – heaven. And as with Marcus’ earl grey tea parfait at his eponymous restaurant, this earl grey ice cream was perfect.  A classic British dish that couldn’t have had a more fitting revival.

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 Eccles cake, cheddar cheese ice cream Now eccles cakes are fairly easy. And they’re bloodyy tasty. But the cheddar cheese ice cream – a revelation. The cheesy flavour subtly filling your mouth right at the end and, in my case, making my eyes become large and the  of noummmmmm come creeping out of my mouth. Nicely garnished with a bit of crispy cheddar. Oh yes! The final course of the meal is definitely the winner by knockout!

 This time I remembered to take a photo of the wine! What a beauty. Great service, even though everyone was anxious and impatient to get home safe. Will definitely be back to try some of the other temptations on the menu.

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Overall Experience: 8
Recommend you to go? 7
Food: 6
Wine:9/a
Website
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Gilbert Scott on Urbanspoon
Square Meal

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