Colectivo Felix, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires is, no doubt a wondrous city, and one that is a walkers heaven, with its countless streets decorated in the most picturesque graffiti, to its numerous restaurants serving the finest steak and Malbec. However, after days of eating meat and all sorts of offal, the desire for something a bit different gets stronger and stronger. Luckily for me, a fellow foodie had previously visited Buenos Aires and been to a supper club by the name of Colectivo Felix  and raved about it (here they’re known as ‘closed door restaurants’) especially as there was no meat served during the course of the meal. As much of a shock as it may seem to most people, it is quite possible to escape the lure of  juicy Argentinian beef and there’s no place better than Felix to experience Argentine cuisine without it. The darling of chef Diego Felix and Sanra Ritten, the food here is nothing short of spectacular, dining in the courtyard of their house with a bunch of people who share a love for all things culinary.

.

.

.

Our evening began with a lemon verbena clerico (white wine cocktail with homegrown verbena) and fontina cheese wrapped in chayote leaves and chañar syrup which was remarkable in every way (the syrup is that of prickly pear, and the leaves too from their garden).

.

Bread and beans
Mbeyu
Herbs n watermelon

.

.

.

.

.

.

All I can say about the red bean pate is that after the first bite, it was literally inhaled!

Mbeyu over suico sauce, salsa criolla, fried pink oyster mushrooms just happened to have the daintiest of flavours coming together with the sauce rounding them all up like an experienced gaucho. Mbeyu is a local ‘cake’ made with mandioca flour and cheese, whilst suico is a local herb (home grown) with flavours redolescent of coriander, tarragon and parsley

Fresh picked green herbs and flowers with grilled watermelon and homemade ketchup may sound like rabbit food and look like something you’d order as a side dish! Luckily, the myriad of flavours in the various and, again, home grown herbs and flowers did lend the dish a very refreshing note and when combined with the watermelon and home made ketchup, the extra dimension worked a treat.

.

Granita
Bream
Pastelito
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Melon and lemon balm granita hailed Buenos Aires’ Italian heritage and was, like the bean pate, inhaled in one go. Creamy and with an intense, but not overpowering citronella flavour, this was neither sweet, nor savoury, but just two simple ingredients doing their work!

Araucaria pine nut locro, sauteed broccolini, chimmichurri encrusted sea bream was a celebration of all things Argentinian. Araucaria is a species of pine that produces nuts about as large as a Brazil nut, which when cooked has the feel of a butter bean, but a pine-nutty flavour. The locro is a bean and beetroot stew. This time, I actually licked the plate clean. Completely.

Blueberry and goats cheese pastelito, jasmine cream, grape marmalade was ridiculously lighter than anyone could ever imagine and the cheese wasn’t a strong goats cheese like we’re used to in England, but a subtle creaminess that only needed the tiniest bit of jasmine cream for a combination so incredible, that our entire table was asking for another portion. The jasmine came from a tree in their courtyard.

.

The wine for the evening was a Diego’s selection to match each course with some divine Torrentes and Malbecs (rose and red). The end of the meal was signalled by a caramelised mate (herb tea) that hailed from Paraguay. This could not have been a better evening. It’s a shame it only takes place Thursday – Saturday

.

Food: 9
Overall experience: 9
Recommend you go: 10
Website

Share