Clogs, canals and windmills: Eating in the Netherlands

Having been toasted in Tuscany and well-watered in Venice it was the cool climes of Germany and the Netherlands that embraced us. Driving from Dusseldorf to Amsterdam makes one feel like Don Quixote with his windmill chasing antics – apart from the new power producing windmills that dot the Dutch countryside, there are still a few functional farmhouse windmills still gracing the landscape. Even though we seemed to have attracted monsoon style torrential rain throughout, our drive was nothing short of beautiful – the never ending flatness of the Dutch plains, roadside orchards and the vast open green spaces.

.


 

 

1870

.

.

.

.

.

.

A restaurant I remembered from my last visit to Amsterdam in 2004, 1870 was just around the corner from our hotel and near the main train station. It serves fresh, simple and very reasonably priced Dutch food with the menu changing daily and only written on a blackboard.

I had the Stampot which is mash potatoes mixed with other vegetables and sometimes bacon (akin to an Irish champ) and on this occasion was served with Dutch sausage, which hit the spot just perfectly and with the restaurant full at all times with both tourists and locals, this one’s a winner!

.

After seeing the stunning Royal Delft porcelain factory where dreams of purchasing exquisite hand painted works of art were entertained and abandoned , we set off on a mission of our own – to hunt down the large ships at Rotterdam harbour (the largest in the world, apparently!)

 .

.

Stormvogel

.

.

.

.

.

.

Whilst we didn’t end up at the main sea harbour, we did, quite by accident chance upon a little tiny inland beach with a dubious looking café. Driven by hunger and the mention of fresh North Sea halibut on the specials board, we sat down and ordered our food, and boy, oh boy! What a treat. Lovely piece of halibut caught locally, sautéed vegetables and a very tasty mash of potatoes, apple, cinnamon and bacon, with all the flavours kept just in check. Yum! And homemade apple pie to finish, which in any northern European country is a must-have, and this took its place amongst the leaders.

 

Share